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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
. superstorm sandy hit in october. so many still reeling from that still trying to get their heat and power back on, and, again, welcome. we are sitting in the cnn weather center where we are watching the snowstorm move all across the northeast, we're live here in the middle of the night for you continuous updates on conditions, we have a team of reporters all across the region. take a look. susan candiotti in boston for us, gary tuchman in staten island and alison kosik in new york. let's begin in boston. look at these cars. think about getting that snow off that car. 19 inches of snow has already fallen and 70-mile-an-hour wind gusts could whip up snow drifts six or seven feet deep. susan candiotti, let me come back to you for me in boston. how are conditions there? >> reporter: well, the snow is swirling. it is miserable. it is cold. but i have to say it doesn't feel quite as cold as it was, you know, a few hours ago, although when i checked the temperature gauge which you're never quite sure if they're quite right, it's reading about 19 degrees, 20 degrees here. and it makes you remembe
especially those hit so hard from superstorm sandy and now you have this massive snowstorm. before i let you go to bed, we all know you cory booker, hands-on mayor. do you anticipate having to help out yourself if necessary tomorrow? >> yeah. i think we all need to take that attitude. obviously my primary concern is working with my command staff to do what is necessary to get the streets clear. i always go out with a group of folks, with shovels and other supplies. so should we see somebody in need we always try to jump out and help. it's a good spirit that i found in newark in past storms and past weather energies as well as snowstorms that folks are helping each other and i try to do my part, as well to demonstrate this is a time where we all need to be hands on and being assistance. i have a great command staff. most of my senior staff turned in an hour or two ago and they are ready for tomorrow. the city's really working in partnership with county authorities, state authorities and new jersey as proven a lot of resilience, especially coming out of sandy. the storm was brutal and difficul
through the snow in boston, and then mary snow in staten island, an area hit by superstorm sandy. first up, poppy harlow. let's get the conditions where you are. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, marty. good morning, everyone. thank you for joining us on this snowy saturday. the sun has come up, the snow has slowed down, the wind gusts are less freekd than they were all through the night. it was torrential here through the evening. i can see down the block, i couldn't see that in the 5:00 eastern hour. now the issue is, how do you clean up? how do you remove the feet of snow that are here? another big issue, huge concern for rhode island folks is the amount of power outages. right now, we've got 187,000 homes without power. that's a big chunk of the population here in this relatively small state. there's big concern about that. and we knew that going into this storm because the snow was wet, it was heavy, and the warmer temperatures actually made it more difficult because that snow weighed on power lines, weighed on trees and now you've got a lot of people without power, ask that me
in the northeast. you just lived through superstorm sandy, pommelled the region, that was back in the end of october. and one of the hardest hit areas, staten island, new york, that's where mary snow is today. tell me how people are doing, how they're feeling today. >> reporter: brooke, the thing that people keep saying is here we go again. this is a punch in the gut, and the last thing people here needed. look around me. get a sense of how much work still needs to be done. if we can just pan over, right near us is a tent where volunteers provide meals every day to people here on staten island, in ts section that was so badly damaged. that's where we met steve chatty. he's displaced with his family. he says he comes here every day for his meals. he says he can't believe that he's still living this way and is in disbelief that another major storm is headed here. >> to be honest with you, becoming numb as far as any weather related, you know, issues. we don't have anything left to lose anymore. we lost everything. so i couldn't worry more about it. it is not going to help with anything. jus
? in the wake of superstorm sandy, people are concerned, will they be weeks without power? >> i wouldn't think weeks. couple of days at the most. for the most part they have a great plan, trying to restore the biggest block first. >> sure. >> if you are without power, make sure you call national grid and let them know you do not have power. otherwise they don't know. >> reporter: i want to get to my colleague, susan candiotti, who is in boston. boston got dumped on even more than we did in providence. over 400,000 without power. susan, is it subsiding a bit where you are? >> reporter: well, it comes and it goes. sometimes we get those powerful wind gusts and then, like now, it seems a bit calm. certainly the snow is much flake yer, lighter than it was during all day yesterday and into the night, when it was that heavy, wet snow that you can easily make a snowball out of. now we are sitting back, because we're noticing that the winds are expected to pick up during the day. and that means -- that, combined with the lighter snow, authorities will be looking for a lot of drifting to happen and tha
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)